Monday, March 22, 2010

John Ford's Moonstruck Phase


Tyrone Power introduces the first of three stories told in the film The Rising of the Moon (1957) with the wry comment that "This is a story about nothing, or perhaps about everything."

For the director John Ford, this roughly 84 minute anthology black and white movie made in Ireland, which he did for free and "the sake of my artistic soul," may be among his most personal films--about--even though today it is probably the least seen of this celebrated filmmaker's movies from the sound era. As revealed in a piece by the New York Post's film critic Lou Lumenick last year, even the director's grandson, Daniel Ford, has only a videotape of this now rare movie, and the exact copyright ownership of the movie appears to be a bit mysterious. Preoccupied, as almost all of Ford's movies were, with the inevitable dissolution of traditions, communities and ties, it was not a realistic movie, having about as much to do with "life as we knew it in the '50s in Ireland as Prince Valiant did to life in the Middle Ages," as one Irish-born friend pointedly told me once. They also feature magnificent casts with Noel Purcell, Cyril Cusack, Donal Donnelly, Frank Lawton, Dennis O'Dea, Jack MacGowran and Eileen Crowe giving life to these off-hand tales.

The quirky The Rising of the Moon (1957) looked back nostalgically through Ford's somewhat foggy, affectionate lens at an imagined world as it might have been or as the director wished it to be. Originally entitled The Three-Leaf Clover, (as well as Three or Four Leaves of the Shamrock, according to some sources), it tells a trio of stories, all related to the theme of personal freedom, in a loose-limbed way. Each of the segments adapted by longtime Ford screenwriter Frank S. Nugent for scale, unfolded, in their seemingly ramshackle way, and celebrate the rituals of comradeship, tradition, chaos, and wholesale blarney that underpinned Ford's vision of Irish life. These casually told and seemingly rambling stories are all tinged with the melancholy that a child of immigrants might feel about a romanticized past he could never fully experience first-hand...more on the Movie Morlocks

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